Welcome to Berkeley Solicitors

We are a niche legal practice firm offering specialized expertise in the areas of Irish and EU Immigration Law.

The firm was started in October 2016 by Karen Berkeley after she had gained twelve years experience working in the areas of asylum and immigration law.  Berkeley Solicitors provides extensive legal services to clients from start to finish of the immigration process in Ireland. We understand the immigration process is often complicated and stressful for our clients. We carefully listen to our clients wishes, and their aspirations for our service. We provide straightforward and practical advice. We work respectfully with the government authorities on our client’s behalf. We aim to facilitate the best resolution for our clients as efficiently as possible.

We believe that our expertise in the immigration law area will benefit clients who are looking for a professional, experienced and efficient legal representation at competitive costs.

The Immigration Blog

CURRENT SYSTEM FOR APPLICATIONS FOR STAMP 4 FOR NON VISA REQUIRED DE FACTO PARTNERS OF IRISH CITIZENS

This article will highlight the current system for applications for Stamp 4 residency for de facto partners of Irish citizens living together in Ireland. In particular, those applicants who are not required to obtain a visa to enter Ireland. At present, our office is currently experiencing an increase of clients seeking advice in relation to decisions refusing their de facto partners application, based on irrelevant considerations.

THE COURT OF APPEAL HAS ISSUED TWO JUDGMENTS WHICH HAVE FAR REACHING CONSEQUENCES FOR APPLICATIONS UNDER SECTION 4(7) OF THE IMMIGRATION ACT 2004

Luximon v. Minister for Justice & Equality (Court of Appeal – 14/12/2016) Balchand v. Minister for Justice & Equality (Court of Appeal – 15/12/2016) The Court of Appeal (Finlay Geoghegan J, Peart J & Hogan J) delivered important judgments on 15th December 2016 in the cases of Luximon & Ors -v- The Minister for Justice & Equality [2016] IECA 382 and Balchand & Ors -v- The Minister for Justice and Equality [2016] IECA 383. These two cases concerning the question of whether, in determining an application for permission to remain by a non-EEA national, made pursuant to section 4(7) of the Immigration Act 2004, the Minister is obliged to consider the applicant’s rights to the respect for private & family life as guaranteed under Article 40.3 of the Irish Constitution and Article 8 of the ECHR. The Court of Appeal held that the High Court Judgment of Barr J in Luximon (20 March 2015) IEHC [2015] 227was correct in finding that there was such an obligation on the Minister. These judgments would appear to mainly affect people who are resident in Ireland on student permission or those who have overstayed their student permission, specifically those who wish to continue to live and work in Ireland after their student permission expires.

Welcome to Berkeley Solicitors

We are a niche legal practice firm offering specialized expertise in the areas of Irish and EU immigration law.

The firm was started in September 2016 by Karen Berkeley after she had gained twelve years experience working in the areas of asylum and immigration law.  Berkeley Solicitors provides extensive legal services to clients from start to finish of the immigration process in Ireland. We understand the immigration process is often complicated and stressful for our clients. We carefully listen to our clients wishes, and their aspirations for our service. We provide straightforward and practical advices. We work respectfully with the government authorities on our client’s behalf. We aim to facilitate the best resolution for our clients as efficiently as possible.

We believe that our expertise in the immigration law area will benefit clients who are looking for a professional, experienced and efficient legal representation at competitive costs.

The Immigration Blog

CURRENT SYSTEM FOR APPLICATIONS FOR STAMP 4 FOR NON VISA REQUIRED DE FACTO PARTNERS OF IRISH CITIZENS

This article will highlight the current system for applications for Stamp 4 residency for de facto partners of Irish citizens living together in Ireland. In particular, those applicants who are not required to obtain a visa to enter Ireland. At present, our office is currently experiencing an increase of clients seeking advice in relation to decisions refusing their de facto partners application, based on irrelevant considerations.

THE COURT OF APPEAL HAS ISSUED TWO JUDGMENTS WHICH HAVE FAR REACHING CONSEQUENCES FOR APPLICATIONS UNDER SECTION 4(7) OF THE IMMIGRATION ACT 2004

Luximon v. Minister for Justice & Equality (Court of Appeal – 14/12/2016) Balchand v. Minister for Justice & Equality (Court of Appeal – 15/12/2016) The Court of Appeal (Finlay Geoghegan J, Peart J & Hogan J) delivered important judgments on 15th December 2016 in the cases of Luximon & Ors -v- The Minister for Justice & Equality [2016] IECA 382 and Balchand & Ors -v- The Minister for Justice and Equality [2016] IECA 383. These two cases concerning the question of whether, in determining an application for permission to remain by a non-EEA national, made pursuant to section 4(7) of the Immigration Act 2004, the Minister is obliged to consider the applicant’s rights to the respect for private & family life as guaranteed under Article 40.3 of the Irish Constitution and Article 8 of the ECHR. The Court of Appeal held that the High Court Judgment of Barr J in Luximon (20 March 2015) IEHC [2015] 227was correct in finding that there was such an obligation on the Minister. These judgments would appear to mainly affect people who are resident in Ireland on student permission or those who have overstayed their student permission, specifically those who wish to continue to live and work in Ireland after their student permission expires.

Get in touch

Our offices are located at 71 Amiens Street, Dublin 1