Tag Archive for: immigration law

UPDATE ON UKRAINIAN NATIONALS TRAVELLING TO IRELAND

UPDATE ON UKRAINIAN NATIONALS TRAVELLING TO IRELAND

The Department of Justice recently announced that from 5th June 2024, temporary measures which allowed Ukrainian nationals to travel to Ireland without a valid biometric passport ceased to be in effect. In accordance with Section 4 of the Immigration Act 2004, all third country nationals, including Ukrainians, must possess a valid biometric passport.

Ireland temporarily suspended the requirement for a biometric passport for Ukrainian nationals in 2022 as part of a wide-ranging emergency response to the full-scale invasion of Ukraine by Russia. Under this suspension, Ukrainian nationals seeking to enter the State could rely upon alternative documentation as proof of their nationality including expired biometric passports or internal passports.

This temporary suspension supported a swift response to the crisis and ensured that those who could not access or renew their travel documents could still flee to safety. However, as the situation has evolved since the outbreak of the war, the Department of Justice is seeking to move to a more sustainable response.

This announcement does not impact the temporary protection status of Ukrainian nationals already in Ireland if they do not have a valid biometric passport. However, it is important for Ukrainian nationals to be aware of this requirement if making any plans to temporarily leave the country as they will require a valid biometric passport to re-enter Ireland.

The full announcement can be found here:

Important Information for Ukrainian nationals – Immigration Service Delivery (irishimmigration.ie)

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

 

UPDATE REGARDING ELIGIBLE SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF GENERAL EMPLOYMENT PERMIT AND INTRA-COMPANY TRANSFEREE IRISH EMPLOYMENT PERMIT HOLDERS

UPDATE REGARDING ELIGIBLE SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF GENERAL EMPLOYMENT PERMIT AND INTRA-COMPANY TRANSFEREE IRISH EMPLOYMENT PERMIT HOLDERS

The Department of Justice and Department of Enterprise, Trade, and Employment recently announced that eligible spouses and partners of General Employment and Intra-Corporate Transferee Permit holders who have applied for and been granted family reunification in the State in accordance with the Department of Justice Non-EEA Family Reunification Policy will now be registered on a Stamp 1G rather than a Stamp 3 permission. In addition, spouses and partners of Critical Skills Employment Permit holders and Researchers on a Hosting Agreement currently on a Stamp 3 are also now eligible for Stamp 1G.

This development enables eligible spouses and partners of these permit holders to work without obtaining a separate employment permit. It does not, however, negate the need for current and future permit holders whose spouses and partners are not in the State to apply for family reunification after 12 months.

Effective immediately from 15th May 2024, eligible spouses and partners who already legally reside in the State and hold a Stamp 3 permission have had their permission to remain in the State varied to the same conditions as Stamp 1G, which are as follows:

  • Permitted to work in the State without the requirement to obtain an employment permit.
  • Permitted to undertake courses of study in the State.
  • Not permitted to establish or operate a business.
  • Not permitted to be self-employed.
  • Renewal of the Stamp 1G registration is required annually, and after 5 years on a Stamp 1G, you may be eligible for a Stamp 4 permission.

As such, they do not need to attend their local immigration office or apply online to obtain a permission to reside on Stamp 1G conditions. A new Irish Residence Permit on Stamp 1G conditions will issue to eligible persons when they seek to renew their current Stamp 3 permission upon its expiry.

Eligible spouses or partners therefore do not need to acquire a new Irish Residence Permit card to engage in employment but can instead provide prospective employers with the following letter in conjunction with their current IRP card: Download Stamp 3 to Stamp 1G Employment Notice. This temporary arrangement is valid until 15th May 2025.

The full announcement can be found here:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/attention-eligible-spouses-and-partners-of-general-employment-permit-and-intra-corporate-transferee-irish-employment-permit-holders/

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

 

MINISTER FOR JUSTICE ANNOUNCES BRIDGING PERMISSION FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDENTS

The Immigration Service Delivery have announced another bridging permission this year for English Language course students who have successfully completed a course and are subsequently enrolled in a Higher Education Programme commencing by end of October 2024.

The bridging permission is a short-term Stamp 2 permission granted until 30th September 2024.

This is relevant for English language students moving to higher education in the coming academic year, whose stamp will expire before they can commence their new course.

This permission is on the basis that applicants will be in a position to provide documentary evidence of a confirmed and fully paid Higher Education Programme listed on the Interim List of Eligible Providers (ILEP) and that the programme commences in September 2024.

Students wishing to avail of this bridging permission must have:

  • An in-date IRP card or a card that has expired within one month when applying for the bridging permission;
  • Successfully completed a 3rd English Language course listed on the ILEP or successfully completed a 2nd English Language course listed on the ILEP on or after 1st July;
  • Have enrolled in and paid fees in full for a Higher Education Programme listed on the ILEP;
  • Apply for a renewal (bridging permission) via their local immigration office.

The bridging permission will allow non-EEA nationals who have successfully completed their 2nd or 3rd English language courses and who are progressing to a Higher Education Course to remain in the State pending commencement of their course.

The full announcement can be found here:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/english-language-students-stamp-2-bridging-permission-2024-update/

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

UPDATES TO THE APPPLICATION PROCESS FOR IRISH TRAVEL DOCUMENTS

The Department of Justice have recently updated the application process for Irish Travel Documents. To make the process more seamless, applications for Irish travel documents have been moved online. Applicants can access the form through the ISD portal.

They advise that applicants use the online application process, this allows the form, copy documents and fee of €55 to be submitted online.

However, applicants are still required to post an original Identity Verification Form (signed in the presence of a guard), passport photographs and Passport/ Travel Document (if applicable) to the Travel Document Section to the Travel Document Section in Dublin.

Please see below guidance note as it elaborates on what documents need to be submitted for each category of application:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/travel/Travel-Document-Applications-Documents-Reference-Guide.pdf

This blog has been drafted with reference to the following website:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/travel/Travel-Document-Applications-Documents-Reference-Guide.pdf

For further details on Irish travel documents please visit the following link:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/coming-to-join-family-in-ireland/applying-for-a-travel-document/

Berkeley Solicitors are available to provide support and assistance to people looking to apply for an Irish Travel Document.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are posted regularly.

 

 

 

UPDATE TO ELIGIBILTY REQUIREMENTS FOR STAMP 4

UPDATE TO ELIGIBILTY REQUIREMENTS FOR STAMP 4

The Department of Justice have recently changed the eligibility requirements for a Stamp 4 upgrade for employment permit holders. Please note that Stamp 4 support letters are no longer required for this upgrade, and your Stamp 4 permission can be registered at your registration office.

Effective from 3rd April 2024, employment permit holders with a Stamp 1 or 1H permission who have completed 21 months of employment are eligible for a Stamp 4 upgrade at their registration office.

The eligible categories include Critical Skills Employment Permit holder, individuals resident on the basis of a Hosting Agreement as a Researcher, or a Multi-Site General Employment Permit holder as a Non-Consultant Hospital Doctor.

General Employment Permit holders can now obtain a Stamp 4 after 57 months as opposed to 60 months. This means that General Employment Permit holders do not have to apply for long-term residence to the Immigration Service Delivery and can instead upgrade their permission to a Stamp 4 at their registration office.

A significant change to this is that the time period is now judged from date of commencement of employment, rather than the date of registration of Stamp 1 permission, as it had been previously. This had been a significant issue for employees recently due to long delays in registration. Commencement of employment in the State will be determined via your Employment Detail Summary, available on revenue.ie/myaccount.

This blog has been drafted with reference to the following website:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/update-to-eligibility-requirements-for-stamp-4-upgrades/

For further details on immigration permissions or stamps please visit the following link:

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/registering-your-immigration-permission/information-on-registering/immigration-permission-stamps/

Berkeley Solicitors are available to provide support and assistance to any employment permit holders looking to upgrade to a Stamp 4.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

RMINISTER FOR JUSTICE ANNOUNCES NEW VISA REQUIREMENTS FOR NATIONALS OF DOMINICA, HONDURAS AND VANUATU, AND VISA WAIVERS FOR CERTAIN DIPLOMATIC PASSPORT HOLDERS

MINISTER FOR JUSTICE ANNOUNCES NEW VISA REQUIREMENTS FOR NATIONALS OF DOMINICA, HONDURAS AND VANUATU, AND VISA WAIVERS FOR CERTAIN DIPLOMATIC PASSPORT HOLDERS

On the 4th of March 2024, the Minister for Justice Helen McEntee announced that, effective from 7th March 2024, nationals of Dominica, Honduras and Vanuatu will now be required to obtain a visa before travelling to Ireland.

A transit visa will also be required for nationals of these countries if they are travelling through Ireland on the way to another destination.

The Minister stated that this decision was made to bring Ireland into closer alignment with the visa regime in the UK and Schengen area.

Transitional arrangements will be put in place for nationals of the affected countries who have existing arrangements to travel to the State in the weeks after the new visa requirements come into effect. For affected people who have made plans to travel to Ireland, and can show evidence of booking and paying for that travel, ISD will try to accommodate emergency travel for customers, in the following circumstances:

‘1. A critical medical case involving a family member being seriously ill or undergoing medical treatment.

  1. Visiting a significant family event – a birth, wedding or funeral.
  2. Taking up a place obtained in a third-level institution on an undergraduate or post graduate degree course.
  3. Taking up employment and holding an Employment Permit for Ireland.
  4. Travelling for business.’

Those attempting to be accommodated for emergency travel in any of the above circumstances must provide suitable evidence of same to ISD.

ISD has announced that if a person believes they fall into any of the above categories, and your scheduled arrival is on or before 7th April 2024, to email [email protected] with the subject line “Visa Imposition – Emergency Travel Required.”

This comes after the announcements that Convention Travel Document holders would now be visa required in July 2022, and that Bolivian nationals would be visa required in September 2023.

Ms McEntee also announced that the visa requirement for diplomatic passport holders of Indonesia, Qatar, Kuwait, Montenegro, Kuwait, Türkiye, Colombia, Peru and Georgia has now been lifted.

The requirement for a visa has also been listed for those accompanying a Minister of the Government of the above referenced countries on an official visit to the State, provided the person has an official passport, service passport or public affairs passport. The same policy applies for Irish diplomats travelling to these countries.

The Minister for Justice announced that this move would enhance the close ties in the political, economic and cultural spheres and continue to develop a close relationship with those countries.

The Minister for Justice stated that the Irish visa requirements are kept under constant review, having regard to the need to ensure that effective immigration controls are in place, whilst also facilitating those who wish to travel to Ireland for the purposes of a visit, to work, to study or to join family members.

The full notice can be found here.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

RECENT HIGH COURT JUDGMENT UPHOLDS DECISION TO REFUSE IRISH PASSPORT TO CHILD OF SUBSIDIARY PROTECTION HOLDER

RECENT HIGH COURT JUDGMENT UPHOLDS DECISION TO REFUSE IRISH PASSPORT TO CHILD OF SUBSIDIARY PROTECTION HOLDER

The High Court has recently delivered a judgement in T.R.I. (A Minor Suing by his Mother and Next Friend L.B.) v The Minister for Foreign Affairs and the Minister for Justice [2024] IEHC 96.

The case concerned a minor child born in Ireland in September of 2019, whose mother holds a declaration of subsidiary protection status.

Subsidiary protection is granted to individuals facing a real risk of suffering serious harm if returned to their country of origin, or their country of former habitual residence.

In August of 2021, the Applicant’s mother applied for an Irish passport on behalf of her child.

Section 6A(1) of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956 states that a person born on the island of Ireland “shall not be entitled” to Irish citizenship unless their parent has, during the four years immediately preceding the birth, a period of reckonable residence of not less than three years.

However, Section 6A(2)(d)(i) qualifies that section 6A(1) does not apply to a child born on the island of Ireland if one parent is entitled to reside in the State “without any restriction” on their residence.

As the mother is a subsidiary protection holder, it was argued that she fell within this subsection of persons who are entitled to reside in the State without any restriction on their period of residence. This would mean the child was entitled to Irish citizenship by birth, even though the mother had less than three years’ reckonable residence in the four years immediately prior to the child’s birth.

This application was refused on the 15th of November 2022, on the basis that Section 6A (2)(d)(i) of the 1956 Act does not apply to a person with subsidiary protection.

The Applicant, through his mother, challenged this decision by way of Judicial Review proceedings in the High Court. It was argued that the mother is entitled to reside in the State without restriction, as the relevant law states that her permission “shall” be renewable, and it is not in any way restricted by time.

The Applicants relied on the Court of Appeal decision in AJK v The Minister for Defence [2020] 2 IR 800, where the Court found that subsidiary protection was “in effect an open-ended right of residence.”

Ms Justice Bolger considered the decision in AJK and stated that she did not consider it established an open-ended right of residence for a person with subsidiary protection. She stated that the comments of Donnelly J must be read in context of the entire judgement and highlighted that the case did not concern citizenship.

Ms Justice Bolger stated that although the law states that the subsidiary protection permission “shall be renewable”, its renewal is in fact conditional; firstly on the continuation of the circumstances that justified the grant of subsidiary protection in the first place, and secondly on there being no compelling reasons of national security or public order.

The Judge stated:

“The mother’s right to renew her permission to reside in the State via her grant of subsidiary protection… is and always was for a temporally restricted permission of a period less than three years subject to conditions.”

Ms Justice Bolger therefore upheld the decision of the Respondent to refuse the child’s application for an Irish passport.

The full judgement can be found here.

If you or a family member have any queries regarding Citizenship, please do not hesitate to contact us.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

PROCESSING TIMES FOR FOREIGN BIRTH REGISTRATION

PROCESSING TIMES FOR FOREIGN BIRTH REGISTRATION

The Department of Foreign Affairs have stated on their website that the current estimated processing time for Foreign Birth Registration (FBR) application is over two years.

Otherwise known as Citizenship by descent, FBR applications are a complex process, requiring applicants to submit official documentation relating to three generations, which may have been issued by several jurisdictions.

The DFA’s guidance for FBR applications on their website states that there has been an increase in the number of these applications being submitted, and notably they have seen an increase in the number of incomplete applications.

The DFA’s guidance emphasises the importance of submitting the required, original documentation and paying the appropriate fee at the time of application to avoid any delays in the processing of your application.

At present the guidance states that after all the correct physical documents are received it takes over two years to process a Foreign Birth Registration application. The website further sates however that they have set up a new Foreign Birth Registration teams in an aim to manage the increased volume of applications and efficiency.

This blog has been drafted with reference to the following website:

https://www.ireland.ie/en/dfa/citizenship/#Foreign%20Birth%20Registration

For further details on applying for Foreign Birth Registration, please visit the following link:

https://www.ireland.ie/en/dfa/citizenship/born-abroad/registering-a-foreign-birth/

Berkeley Solicitors are available to provide support and assistance to any Foreign Birth Registration applicants.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.

UPDATE REGARDING ELIGIBLE SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF GENERAL EMPLOYMENT PERMIT AND INTRA-COMPANY TRANSFEREE IRISH EMPLOYMENT PERMIT HOLDERS

STAMP 0 PERMISSION ACCEPTED AS RECKONABLE RESIDENCE FOR NATURALISATION

Berkeley Solicitors have recently received a number of successful naturalisation decisions for clients resident on Stamp 0 permission.

In approving the applications for our clients, the Department of Justice have accepted that Stamp 0 is reckonable residence for the purposes of naturalisation.

These decisions are significant given that the Department have previously maintained that Stamp 0 residence permission is a low-level immigration status which is granted for a limited and specific stay in Ireland.

There are three main types of persons eligible for Stamp 0:

 

  1. Elderly dependent relatives
  2. Persons of independent means
  3. Visiting academics

This is very welcome news for individuals resident in the State on Stamp 0 permission, many of whom have made Ireland their permanent home but have concerns regarding their reckonable residence in the State for the purposes of naturalisation.

Although acquiring citizenship is a privilege and not a right and is subject to the Minister’s absolute discretion, the Minister must act within the confines of the statutory definition of reckonable residence as defined at Section 16 A of the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, as amended.

We at Berkeley Solicitors welcome this very encouraging development surrounding reckonable residence and we congratulate our clients on their successful applications.

We are happy to advise any clients wishing to pursue their naturalisation application.

UPDATE REGARDING ELIGIBLE SPOUSES AND PARTNERS OF GENERAL EMPLOYMENT PERMIT AND INTRA-COMPANY TRANSFEREE IRISH EMPLOYMENT PERMIT HOLDERS

NOTICE ON NON-EEA NATIONALS AWAITING AN EU NATIONAL PASSPORT

The Immigration Service Delivery have published a notice in response queries of Non-EEA nationals who await the issuance of an EU Passport, of their status and obligations in the State.

The notice has clarified that Non-EEA nationals, who are in receipt of court documents stating that they are citizens of an EU country, must hold a valid immigration permission to remain legally resident in the State.

Individuals in this position therefore must ensure to contact their national embassy to keep their Irish immigration permissions up to date while they await their EU passport. Court documents stating that they are citizens of an EU country will not suffice in proving their legal residency in the interim.

Individuals must also ensure to comply with the obligations of their immigration permissions whilst they await the issuance of their EU passport.

Please see the below link for further details:

 

https://www.irishimmigration.ie/non-eea-national-awaiting-an-eu-national-passport/

 

Berkeley Solicitors are available to provide support and assistance to any residence applicants.

This blog article has been prepared on the basis of current immigration law and policy, which is subject to change. Please keep an eye on our blog and Facebook page where articles relating to updates and changes in immigration law and policy are regularly posted.